Checking SQL Server errorlog in Azure Managed Instance

-> I executed xp_readerrorlog in SSMS and could see the command working fine in Managed Instance same as the On-Premise SQL server.

-> Azure Managed Instance version details from error log,

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-> Azure Managed Instance version details using @@version,

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-> The version numbers are different just as the type. I think this will reflect same details in future. The official documentation states that “A Managed Instance runs with all of the features of the most recent version of SQL Server, including online operations, automatic plan corrections, and other enterprise performance enhancements.”.

Update from Microsoft Engineer :  Azure Managed Instance is still considering as a PAAS offering which is similar to SQL Azure database, so the “select @@version” will return a similar thing as SQL Azure database.
The Errorlog is something that can be considered as a backed service data for SQL Azure, so it is reflecting the real version of the database engine.

-> There are many trace flags enabled by default. We will discuss what these trace flags do in a separate post.

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-> SQL Server errorlog shows that 24 logical processors are detected.

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-> Checking the instance properties, the processor count is 24.

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-> But, I have selected 8 cores while building the managed instance. Checking sys.dm_os_schedulers shows that we have 8 online schedulers based on the below screenshot,

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-> Checking the processors tab in server properties shows that we only have 8 cores assigned to the Managed Instance,

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-> The extra cores may be used in case the managed instance is scaled up.

-> Memory manager uses conventional memory and not locked pages in memory. Instance collation is SQL_Latin1_general_CP1_CI_AS.

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-> Instant file initialization is disabled.

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-> The errorlog log contains detailed messages than the On-Premise SQL Server. There are many debug-level messages in the errorlog. It seems like these messages will be used by Microsoft Engineers to troubleshoot issues related to Managed Instance.  The traceflags enabled by default on a managed Instance could be the reason for these debug-level messages. I am not sure if these trace flags and messages will be removed after the preview.

-> This article explains about the procedure sp_readmierrorlog that removes most of the debug-messages that are not really required for a normal user.

Thank You,
Vivek Janakiraman

Disclaimer:
The views expressed on this blog are mine alone and do not reflect the views of my company or anyone else. All postings on this blog are provided “AS IS” with no warranties, and confers no rights.

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